Hoopscritic Free Agency Round table

Hoopscritic Free Agency Round table

  Where will Kevin Durant take his talents this offseason? Where should Kevin Durant take his talents this offseason? Brian Geltzeiler Durant will stay right where he is in OKC.  The financial benefits are too great and OKC represents his best chance to win a title next season.  He’ll sign a 2 year deal with a one year opt out so he can be a free agent with 10 years of service time and get a max contract in the summer of 17 at 35% of a much higher cap…. Oliver Maroney I think he just wants to go through the process. Players like to be wanted and I don’t think Durant is much different from other players in that regard. I think he knows where he wants to be, but wants to be “sure” of it. Similar to car shopping, you go in knowing what you’d like but want to test drive the options, just to know that you’re not “‘missing out”. 1B. I think it would be wise of Durant to stay for a one year deal, with another year as a player option. Not only will this allow him the freedom, but will ensure he doesn’t get stuck if Westbrook were to leave. Kevin Durant will become this generations’ Kobe Bryant if he were to stay with one team his entire career. Will he? I don’t know. But he’s got a top-five player to play alongside, a coach that was in his first NBA season, and a city that he completely immersed himself in. Based on the options and what’s available, I don’t see much of...
Dad, Where Do Basketball Players Come From? – A Defense of the Draft

Dad, Where Do Basketball Players Come From? – A Defense of the Draft

If television is to be believed, there is no more terrifying situation for an adult than to be asked by a child, “where do babies come from?” Presumably funny at one time, the trope does little more than obscure a modestly profound philosophical bent: everything’s got to come from somewhere. If you wish to know the answer to that question, click here. If you wish to know where I’m going with this rambling nonsense, read on for more rambling nonsense and also maybe a wonderfully buried point about something or other. Earlier this week, Bleacher Report’s Howard Beck wrote a very smart column about whether or not the Knicks should look to trade their first round pick this summer for veteran talent. The piece was filled with sensible points, such as Carmelo Anthony’s age (30) and what would constitute a reasonable trade package (an established All Star and a role player). While there’s nothing to outright reject, Beck did creep up to, and then later aggressively approach via Twitter, a fine line about the draft that ought not to be crossed. The problem w/”trade the pick” concept is that, at this time of year, fans buy every ounce of hype re prospects. They’re all future stars. — Howard Beck (@HowardBeck) March 12, 2015 When, of course, draft history suggests otherwise. The same guys people are frothing over today could be ripped as “busts” in two years. — Howard Beck (@HowardBeck) March 12, 2015 But people are forever fascinated by potential and promise and the allure of the 19-year-old who might become a star. — Howard Beck (@HowardBeck) March 12,...
Roundtable Discussion: NBA Trade Deadline

Roundtable Discussion: NBA Trade Deadline

Who was the big winner at the deadline? Jamie The trade deadline itself. You’re damn right that’s a cop out. With the exception of Utah and Phoenix, all the teams involved in a significant trade came out in better shape. It was a remarkable chain of events that led to a lot of teams getting exactly what they needed. Plus, it was loads of fun, something we haven’t been able to say about recent deadlines. The downside of the analytics movement has been a surge of reports that follow this format: “Team 1 wants to trade player X for a player younger, cheaper and better than player X and a draft pick.” For a moment, it looked like the magic of the deadline was lost for another year. Then Woj tweeted about Reggie Jackson getting traded to the Pistons and all hell broke loose. Justin Big Winner: The extremely sad Chris Bosh news aside, the Miami Heat. I once thought Pat Riley was an overrated GM, but that’s over with: he pulled a huge score here. No player Riley dealt has any real value: he essentially dealt a top 7 protected pick, and a pick so far in the distance he likely won’t even be around to see it, for an elite player, and seriously upgraded the roster. Some have criticized this trade because the popular trend in the NBA is to stockpile picks and assets and build properly, but your plan should always be specific to what you have. Dwyane Wade is 33, Chris Bosh soon to turn 31. Miami does not have time to sit and wait...
Round Table DIscussion: Part 2 – Most Improved Player? Can Clippers Win It All? Who Misses Playoffs?

Round Table DIscussion: Part 2 – Most Improved Player? Can Clippers Win It All? Who Misses Playoffs?

With 20% of the season to judge, Who’s the Most Improved Player so far? Justin Oppenheim I know what you’re thinking: it’s Jimmy Butler. He’s the leading scorer on a star-laden Chicago Bulls team, he’s averaging almost nine more points per game than last year and he’s managed to increase both his usage and his efficiency against all measures AND he’s an all-around swell guy. But you’re wrong. It’s Brandon Knight. While the rest of the Bucks are like the Big Thunder Mountain Railroad, Knight is the Tomorrowland Speedway. You don’t know what you’re going to get on a given night from most of the Bucks roster, and half the time you can’t even guess which direction whatever it is you do end up getting is going to come from. Knight is the exception, and he’s the reason Milwaukee has a winning record. While Giannis is doing Giannis things, and Jabari Parker is taking his lumps as a rookie, Knight never veers out of his lane. He’s the veteran leader of a reckless group despite only being in his fourth season, and he’s counted on to be the team’s sole consistent scorer. Butler, Reggie Jackson, Evan Fournier and Jared Sullinger have all seen their numbers rise dramatically this season, no one in the league has matured as much as Knight. Having leadership thrust upon you not due to merit, but because no one else is capable of taking those reigns, is always a tricky thing. Knight has worn it well. Jacob Noble This has to be the hardest decision. Not because it is so early in the season and...
Round Table Discussion:  Part 1 – Best Team In East?  Who Makes WCF? What’s Wrong In Detroit?

Round Table Discussion: Part 1 – Best Team In East? Who Makes WCF? What’s Wrong In Detroit?

Welcome to the first series of our round table discussion. All season long, you will see round table discussions with the staff at Hoopscritic. If you have any questions you would like to submit, comment below and we will answer and tweet you. 1) With Cleveland still figuring each other out and DeRozan out for Toronto. Who’s the best team in the East (and why)? Jacob Noble We actually have a tale of two cities with this question. On one hand, we have the Chicago Bulls. They are probably most expert’s pick for best team in the East based on the fact that the Bulls have been missing Derrick Rose and Pau Gasol early in this season. It’s hard to argue with this logic when the Bulls are 5-1 with Rose and a .500 club without him. If he is playing every game in the second half and into the Playoffs, the Bulls should be the favorite. This Chicago group, minus Gasol, have been together for a while. It’s starting to feel like do or die for this squad. Now on the other hand, we have the Washington Wizards. Let my start off by mentioning that the DeMar DeRozan injury was crucial for the Raptors and Cleveland is still trying to figure out too many things this season. Washington on the other hand has a solid roster that is built to with young and old. They currently sit 10-5 with all 5 losses coming at the hands of playoff teams (Mia, Tor, Dal, Atl, Cle). They are starting to get healthy with Beal returning after missing the start of...
Sam Hinkie:  The Smartest Man In The NBA

Sam Hinkie: The Smartest Man In The NBA

The reason you don’t have polio right now is because in the 1700’s someone had the radical idea to expose people to a less potent version of the disease (small pox) that was killing everyone at the time.  Lots of intelligent people said you can’t do that, but Edward Jenner and his historical successors went ahead and did it anyway and now you don’t have to worry about anything scarier than Ebola.  In fact, the concept behind vaccinations is so stupid in a profoundly brilliant way that people are still complaining about it today. Philadelphia 76ers general manager Sam Hinkie is not trying to cure Ebola.  It’s not his line of work.  But Hinkie is making lots of intelligent people shout “you can’t do that” at him thanks to a uniquely reckless approach to a longstanding problem.  In a constipated NBA, Hinkie might just be the clearest thinker in the business. The formula for building a championship team is relatively simple and straightforward.  Get one of the five best players in the world, find one of the fifteen or so best players in the world to play next to him, and then fill out the rest of the roster with pieces that fit neatly around the two stars.  The order in which a GM does this isn’t all that important, as the whole thing flows down from that first step anyway. Getting one of the five best players in the world is actually the least challenging part of the equation for a GM.  It more or less comes down to being lucky.  You either land the right pick in...