Episode 5: The Pull Up Podcast with Bryan Crawford

Episode 5: The Pull Up Podcast with Bryan Crawford

The Pull Up Podcast this week featured Bryan Crawford from SLAM and based in Chicago. Bryan and Jacob broke down the Bulls cancelling practice, analyzed the half way point, looked at the records of the different starting units and broke down Derrick Rose recent three pointing surge. Don’t miss this episode if you are a Bulls fan! Check Out Sports Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with The Pull Up Podcast or...
A Snap Judgement on the NBA’s Rookie Class

A Snap Judgement on the NBA’s Rookie Class

There’s genius everywhere, but until they turn pro, it’s like popcorn in the pan. Some pop… Some don’t. – Jerry Maguire Isn’t that the truth of it, every year via the NBA draft we get the next generation of stars, flops, busts, role players, specialists, and everything in-between. The higher up in the draft the easier the pick is supposed to be right? Wrong. Every single year someone messes it up, and every single year at least one person gets a steal. Now the paid scouts have their systems, their algorithms, their sources, and best of all their pay cheques. But what about your average hoo-hah sitting on his lap top tweeting away about how so and so is the next great one, or a future bust based on the 20 minutes of March Madness he watched? What about that guy? Well his job isn’t at stake, so he can say whatever he likes. For better or for worse, people get these notions in their head prior to the draft, that the future of certain players is ensured. When in fact, is it ever? Life has a funny, twisted way of going about things. Sometimes tragedy hits, sometimes the college game doesn’t translate to the NBA, and sometimes you just can’t account for the growth or lack of growth in a prospect. And yet time after time somebody watches one highlight film on YouTube, or 30 minutes of SportsCenter, and declares that they’ve seen a “can’t miss prospect,” or a “for sure bust.” Part of that need to label players and contribute an opinion comes from being a fan,...
Round Table Discussion: Part 4 – Addition by Subtraction? Who Will Be Traded Next? How the West Will Play Out?

Round Table Discussion: Part 4 – Addition by Subtraction? Who Will Be Traded Next? How the West Will Play Out?

Via ESPN Why do teams like Toronto and Detroit get better after moving a player like Rudy Gay or Josh Smith? Justin Salkin The upticks seen in Toronto and Detroit highlight the shift of the NBA from its love for high volume and/or inefficient scorers, into today’s efficiency generation. Josh Smith was using 25.2% of Pistons’ possessions. He likes to hold the ball – a problem in today’s drive and kick game — and has a penchant for taking poor shots. He also submarines offenses by taking shots he struggles making — cannot shoot the 3, but with the exception of 2009-2010, when he cut back in a noble way, he has always fired with impunity. The Pistons are benefitting from replacing his inefficient use of 25% of its possessions, by spreading those possessions around in smarter ways. Smith is not the player he once was, but plays like he is, and his choice to continue to try to force That highlights the issue with both Smith and Gay at their prior stops: roster fit. On a Pistons team with 2 core bigs, Smith was a bad fit. Bigs thrive with players who can space the floor, but Smith does just the opposite, and instead mucked it up. He could either stand at the 3 point line and take bad threes (it’s tougher to beat 3’s off the dribble than 4’s), or stand in the post and take real estate from Drummond and Monroe. Yes, Smith was a better athlete in his Atlanta days, but he also fit his roster much better. The Hawks typically played multiple plus shooters...